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15 Dec 2009

The Juice Doctor’s ‘Holiday Season Survival Guide’, with contributions from five times Olympic Gold Medallist, Sir Steve Redgrave and Dale Pinnock, the UK’s first Medicinal Cook

Top Ten Tips Part 1: Surviving the Christmas Party

With the Christmas party season well underway, it is easy to fall into hangover hell with all the tasty (and free!) drinks on offer. These tips, from The Juice Doctor, Sir Steve Redgrave and Dale Pinnock, will help keep you partying all the way through the night, and help ease the next day too:

1. Prepare Yourself for a night ahead by drinking lots of water before hand, or even better, an isotonic drink with added vitamins and minerals.

Five times Olympic gold medallist Sir Steve Redgrave said: “Isotonic dinks like the Juice Doctor offer improved hydration over drinking water alone. They also taste better. So if you do struggle to drink water on its own don’t rule it out completely. Consider a naturally isotonic drink to help support your body’s hydration needs.”

2. Pace Yourself! It’s all too easy to over indulge – try drinking a fruit juice or glass of water with a twist of lemon or lime in-between each alcoholic drink (carbonated drinks increase the absorption of alcohol whilst water slows absorption). This will also help to minimise the impact of a hangover since alcohol dehydrates the body, and dehydration is the main factor in the morning after headache.

3. Know when to Mix – Try not to mix different kinds of alcohol; for example, if you’re drinking red wine – do not switch over to vodka or rum-based drinks towards the end of the evening. It’s a guaranteed way to feel worse in the morning. Also, know your own body – steer clear of certain types of alcohol that have made you feel ill in the past.  Mix It Up– If you do favour spirits, try cocktails or mixes with grapefruit, orange or cranberry juice to get some added vitamins.

4. Ice Ice Baby – Adding lots of ice to your drink will make it go further and dilute the alcohol.

5. Eat Something – Drinking alcohol on an empty stomach is a recipe for disaster, so make sure you eat something beforehand. After you have been drinking eat something that is easily digestible and healthy, such as yogurt, bread or crackers; this will help you regain some of the essential amino acids that have been lost.

Dale Pinnock, the UK’s first Medicinal Cook reminds us “Nuts can also be a good snack as they are a great source of B vitamins.  These water soluble nutrients are easily lost when drinking alcohol, and their loss can make us feel exhausted and very groggy”.

6. Know Your Limits – There are only a couple of drinks between feeling tipsy and being drunk. Learn to be able to identify that feeling so you’ll know when it’s time to put the brakes on.

7. Drink Slowly – When socializing it’s easy to work your way through several drinks without realizing it. Try to sip your alcohol and not have more than one drink per hour.

The Juice Doctor says: Your brain tissue is 85% water; keeping yourself hydrated keeps your mind sharp and articulate. When you become dehydrated the brain shrinks away from the skull and triggers the pain sensors on the outside surface of the brain, this causes a throbbing headache.

8. Keep Hold of Your Drink – Never leave it unattended. It is easy to confuse the amount you are drinking if you leave a drink here and there, plus there is always the risk of being spiked.

9. Designated Driver – Make sure one person in your group is assigned as the designated driver before anyone hits the bar.

10. Sobering Up – As a general rule of thumb, it takes as many hours to sober up as the number of drinks ingested.

Final word from Dale Pinnock, the UK’s first Medicinal Cook – Buy some Magic Milk Thistle – this common herbal remedy is available from any health store, and could be one of your best friends during the party season. It contains a chemical called sylimarin that has been shown in studies, to minimise chemical damage to cells within the liver.

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